10 Top Tourist Attractions in Cambodia

The beautifully carved temples of Angkor are Cambodia's fantastic appeal, but the nation also includes thriving minority settlements and large stretches of wilderness. Our Southeast Asia experts have visited Cambodia numerous times, meeting skilled guides and seeking comfortable beds in picturesque surroundings.

There are so many tourist attractions in Cambodia that it is impossible to ignore them anymore. Continue this article to examine it with Cambodia Immigration Services!

10. Preah Vihear

Preah Vihear is a Khmer temple perched on a 525-meter (1,722-foot) cliff in the Dângrêk Mountains, near the Cambodia-Thailand border. It is in the most picturesque location of all Khmer temples.

The majority of the temple constructions were built during the reigns of Khmer monarchs Suryavarman I and Suryavarman II in the 11th and 12th centuries. It was named after the Hindu deity Shiva. Preah Vihear has been the subject of an ongoing territorial dispute between Thailand and Cambodia, and in 2009, numerous soldiers were killed in clashes between the two nations.

9. Sihanoukville

The Bokor Hill Station, located on Bokor Mountain in Preah Monivong National Park, was a famous luxury summer getaway for French colonists seeking to escape the severe heat of Phnom Penh in the early 1920s. It was abandoned in the 1940s due to the Japanese invasion, and invaded again in the 1970s under Pol Pot's cruel Khmer Rouge regime.

It is now a ghost town, yet the bulk of the structures remain. It has various French colonial structures such as a royal home, chapel, casino, and hotel. The fact that the Cambodian government still maintains a ranger post on the site emphasizes its strategic importance.

8. Tonlé Sap

Tonlé Sap is a natural attraction in Cambodia. This is a wetland area that includes the Tonlé Sap Lake and the 75-mile-long Tonlé Sap River, both of which are part of the extensive floodplain of the Mekong River. The lake is notable for undergoing a stunning makeover each year. It has a maximum depth of three feet and an area of roughly 1,000 square miles during the dry season.

When the monsoon rains arrive, the lake expands considerably to a depth of 30 feet and a total scope of 6,200 square kilometers. Because of the seasonal influence of this massive volume of water, the Tonle Sap River changes direction twice a year.

The lake is home to floating towns, one of the world's largest freshwater fish, the Mekong giant catfish, and a considerable population of many reptile species, including several types of freshwater snakes.

The lake attracts a huge number of migrating birds, including the spot-billed pelican, greater adjutant, Bengal florican, and grey-headed fish eagle, among others. The region has been recognized as a biodiversity hotspot and a UNESCO biosphere reserve since 1997 due to its ecological significance.

7. The Silver Pagoda

The Silver Pagoda, also known as Wat Ubosoth Ratanaram, is located on the grounds of the Royal Palace in the center of Phnom Penh. This is one of Cambodia main attractions that attract a large number of tourists each year.

The 5000 silver tiles that cover its floor inspired the name. It houses two of the country's most notable Buddha sculptures, a 17th-century crystal Buddha and a life-size Maitreya Buddha adorned with 9584 diamonds.

The inside walls of the pagoda courtyard are covered with a mural depicting the Ramayana narrative, which was created by 40 Khmer artisans between 1903 and 1904. The Silver Pagoda is presently used as a tourist attraction and for royal and national celebrations.

6. Bokor Hill Station

The Bokor Hill Station, located on Bokor Mountain in Preah Monivong National Park, was a famous luxury summer getaway for French colonists seeking to escape the severe heat of Phnom Penh in the early 1920s. It was abandoned in the 1940s due to the Japanese invasion, and it was abandoned again in the 1970s under Pol Pot's cruel Khmer Rouge regime.

It is now a ghost town, yet the majority of the structures remain. It has various French colonial structures, such as a royal home, chapel, casino, and hotel. The fact that the Cambodian government still maintains a ranger post on the site emphasizes its strategic importance.

5. Kratié

Kratié is a tranquil old French colonial market town on the banks of the Mekong River in eastern Cambodia. Its marketplace remains central, surrounded by French colonial architecture. The city is well-known for being the home of the Irrawaddy Dolphins. These remarkable animals have lived here for decades and have a symbiotic connection with the local fisherman, assisting them in catching fish. There are just approximately 80 dolphins left here, according to estimates.

4. Koh Ker

Koh Ker is a faraway archeological site in northern Cambodia, approximately 75 miles from Siem Reap. It was one of the most important places during Khmer sovereignty and briefly served as the Khmer Empire's capital. This place has some incredible monuments. Prasat Thom, a magnificent pyramid that rises 98 feet into the air, is the most prominent.

Unlike Angkor Wat, the temples of Koh Ker are scattered among lush forests with minimal human population in and around the site. Many of the temples are concealed behind dense overgrowth or are too risky to reach due to the presence of explosives.

3. Banteay Srei

Banteay Srei, considered by many to be the crown gem of Angkorian art and frequently referred to as the "Art Gallery of Angkor," is a 10th-century Hindu temple dedicated to Shiva. The temple is made of pinkish stone and features some of the best stone sculptures on the planet.

It is one of the smaller sites in Angkor, having begun in 967 CE, but what it lacks in scale, it makes up for in height. It has been well-kept, and many of the sculptures are three-dimensional.

2. Bayon Temple

The Bayon temple, part of the world-famous Angkor complex, displays a sea of over 200 gigantic stone faces facing in all directions. Many believe the odd smiling faces are a depiction of King Jayavarman VII or a blend of him and Buddha, and they are an instantly identifiable image of Angkor.

The Bayon was created in the 12th century by King Jayavarman VII as part of a vast expansion of his capital Angkor Thom. It is located exactly in the middle of the royal city.

1. Angkor

Angkor is one of biggest tourist attractions in Cambodia. This was the Khmer Empire’s capital city, which thrived between the 9th and 15th centuries and is by far the most popular Cambodian tourist destination. Today, the city lies in stunning ruins near Siem Reap, tucked among forests and farms.

There are approximately 1,000 temples here, ranging in size from mounds of rubble in the rice fields to the spectacular Angkor Wat, which rises over three layers to a height of 669 feet and is the world's most significant single religious monument; it inspires and mesmerizes those who visit. Arrive early in the morning to watch the sunrise over this majestic edifice. UNESCO has classified the entire architectural complex as a World Heritage Site.

Many tourist attractions in Cambodia are historic and attractive objects that draw travelers' attention. Simply refer to this article to create a list of your favorite locations and conquer new areas. Get Cambodia visa by our Cambodia e-Visa service to have a pleasant time on your future journey!

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